Irwin Gratz

Morning Edition Producer

Irwin was born and reared in New York City and, while he never hiked miles to school, he did walk up six flights of stairs every day to the apartment his family lived in until he was nearly 19. Irwin remains a lover of subway rides, egg creams, and the New York Mets. He moved to Maine in 1978 and worked a dozen years in commercial radio in Sanford, then Portland, before beginning to freelance for MPBN in 1990. He's been local anchor of Morning Edition since September, 1992.

From September 2004 to October 2005, Irwin served as national President of the Society of Professional Journalists, the nation's largest and most broad-based journalism organization. He holds a Master's Degree in Journalism from New York University.

Irwin also has an interest in astronomy which he indulges to this day as an occasional show presenter at the Southworth Planetarium in Portland. And he swims - a lot. Irwin has completed 5 Peaks Island-to-Portland swims. Irwin is married and has a young son.

Ways To Connect

Irwin Gratz / MPBN

PORTLAND, Maine - Developers offered a glimpse today of what a redeveloped Portland Company complex might look like.

Developer Jim Brady unveiled a couple of artist drawings that showed the more historic buildings on the site restored and a new, pedestrian corridor that would lead from Fore Street down steps to the waterfront.

Brady told a gathering this was in keeping with Portland's long-time desires for the site. "Number one among those is reconnecting the public to Portland's waterfront."

The current issue of the Maine Policy Review, published by the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center at the University of Maine, takes a multifaceted look at the role the humanities play in our lives. In part three of our series on the issue, MPBN Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz talks with University of Maine professor Michael Grillo and UMaine Archivist Desiree Butterfield-Nagy about the future of archives in a digital age.

The current issue of the Maine Policy Review, published by the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center at the University of Maine, takes a multi-faceted look at the role the humanities play in our lives. In part two of our series on the issue, MPBN Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz talks with Anna Sims Bartel. Bartel is now associate director of Cornell University's Center for Engaged Learning and Research.

PORTLAND, Maine - What role do the humanities play in our lives? It's the subject of the current Maine Policy Review, published by the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center at the University of Maine. MPBN Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz is embarking on a series of interviews on the topic. In this post, he talks with Kirsten Jacobson, an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Maine.

There was a time on Maine's midcoast when a common greeting on the street was the phrase, "Do you think they'll have it?" And the responses were equally odd.

"I heard one once, that was the men's got the tents up and women's got the pies all made," Luthera Dawson told Keith Shortall in an interview from the MPBN archives.

Some of the localisms and dialects that were once part of our state are still heard on the street, but others are disappearing.

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