Susan Sharon

Deputy News Director

Susan is the deputy news director who handles assignments and planning by the news staff. She's also a general assignment reporter who began her career at MPBN working at the State House in 1992. Since then she has covered major political and environmental stories, winning national awards for her beat reporting twice from the Society for Environmental Journalists. Her coverage of labor issues, including an investigative series on independent contractors, has also been recognized by the Public Radio News Directors, Inc and by the Associated Press. Susan is a graduate of the University of Montana where she got her first job in public radio news while still a student. She has also worked at television stations in Montana and Maine.

Ways To Connect

AUGUSTA, Maine - The group that launched successful efforts to legalize recreational marijuana in Colorado and Alaska is officially taking steps to do the same in Maine.

Susan Sharon / MPBN

AUGUSTA, Maine - Supporters of a second proposal to legalize recreational marijuana are moving closer to their goal of putting a citizens' initiative before Maine voters in 2016.

Susan Sharon / MPBN

AUBURN, Maine - Authorities are diverting traffic away from an accident involving a train and a tractor trailer at a railroad crossing near the Tambrands plant on the outskirts of Auburn.

Auburn Fire Chief Frank Roma says it appears that an 18-wheeler that was hauling rock was struck by a locomotive as it was going through the crossing on Hotel Road.

Susan Sharon / MPBN

FALMOUTH, Maine — The Maine Audubon Society here has a new solar panel system that will help reduce energy costs, curb reliance on oil and limit carbon emissions.

It's all thanks to an unusual partnership with Moody's Collision Centers, which is paying for all 144 of the solar panels, and Revision Energy, which installed them.

AUGUSTA, Maine — A spokesman for Maine's Public Utilities Commission is defending a controversial 2-1 vote by commissioners Tuesday to limit spending for energy efficiency programs to $22 million a year.

This is well below the $60 million cap that some lawmakers say they intended when they passed a widely supported omnibus energy bill in 2013. And the lone holdout on the panel says concerned parties may have to pursue a remedy in the courts.

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