Tom Porter

News Producer

That very British voice you've begun hearing on Maine Things Considered belongs to our newest reporter, Tom Porter, who comes to us after a prior stint as a reporter at WVTF-FM, a public radio station in Roanoke, Virgina.

A native of Birmingham, England, Tom comes from a family of British journalists. He worked for nearly eight years at Bloomberg Television and Radio in London as a reporter and news producer. He is also trained jazz pianist. Tom has a bachelor's degree from the University of London and a master's degree from Kings College in London.

Tom has a strong background in environmental reporting, chronicling the drought affecting much of the south, innovation in “green” construction and building design and advances in biotechnology.

Ways To Connect

Courtesy: White Dog Arts

LEWISTON, Maine - Fifty years ago on Monday, the city of Lewiston was in the international sporting spotlight when world heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali came to Maine to defend his crown, for the first time, against Sonny Liston.

Tom Porter / MPBN

BATH, Maine — Hundreds of shipyard workers took to the streets in Bath Thursday to protest changes being introduced by management at Bath Iron Works.

Tom Porter / MPBN

SCARBOROUGH, Maine - A Maine-based non-profit is hoping to expand a program that aims to provide older, ailing, and often lonely veterans with support and companionship from someone with a shared military background.

PORTLAND, Maine — Union officials representing some employees at MaineToday Media — publisher of the Portland Press Herald, Kennebec Journal and other newspapers — have voiced their concern over the impending sale of the organization.

Tom Porter / MPBN

The Conservation Law Foundation Monday formally launched a initiative that provides pro bono legal assistance to local farmers, food entrepreneurs and the organizations that support them.

The Legal Services Food Hub is modeled on a similar program in Massachusetts. Proponents say it aims to scale up the local food system by taking some of the pressure off small-scale farmers and others in Maine's food production business.

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